Part 2


The church of St. Margaret is a small but exquisitely beautiful building, situated on the bank of the river Wye. It occupies the site of the former edifice, and was erected in 1858 from the designs of Mr. Thomas H. Rushforth, of Regent street, London, at a cost of £2,680, the whole of which was defrayed by the late rector and Stephen Allaway, Esq. It consists of nave (in the Norman style), chancel with vestry attached, south aisle, western porch, and tower (in the Early English style). The interior is adorned with beautiful stained glass by Clayton & Bell, of London, while the pulpit, reading desk, font, &c., are splendid specimens of carving in Caen stone, inlaid with different-coloured marbles and alabaster. The organ was built by Gray & Davison, of London, and is a fine-toned instrument. The altar table and chancel stalls are of carved oak. There are 96 sittings in the body of the church, all free. The only ancient monument is an effigy, supposed to be that of the Countess of Salisbury, nurse to Henry V. It occupies a niche in the east wall of the aisle. The parish registers commence with the year 1699; some are very imperfect.

Building history: Allaway hired the architect TH Rushforth of London, and furnished him with the funds, of £2,680 to create a quite remarkable building, bursting with detail. Allaway may well have been the Managing Partner, Lydbrook Tin Works.. It consists of nave (in the Norman style), chancel with vestry attached, south aisle, western porch, and tower (in the Early English style).
TH Rushforth also designed St Denis’s Chapel at Harewood Park a few years later in1864

Some artefacts from the previous church on the site, which was mentioned in the Book of Llandaff and in Charters of 1069 and 1160, were relocated in the church, such as the effigy of a Lady, while other monuments and fittings were removed, for example the Vaughan memorials which were moved to the chapel of St Mary at Courtfield. The church is basically unchanged since construction.


Ground plan: 3-bay nave and 2-bay south aisle, two-bay chancel, north vestry, south-west tower, west porch.


Dimensions: Nave and aisle 12m (37ft) wide, the nave 11m (34ft) long; chancel 7m (21.5ft) x 3.50m (11ft).


Building materials: The walls are built of local sandstone ashlar, with the exception of the rubble base of the tower, which like the churchyard cross may be medieval material. The dressings are of Bathstone, with polished Welsh slate shafts. Timber roof covered in machine-made clay tiles.


Ref: Extract from Littlebury's Directory and Gazetteer of Herefordshire, 1876-7
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/HEF/WelshBicknor/Littlebury1876.html

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